Eclipse Photos from North Phoenix

People all around the country watched the solar eclipse today—online, on TV and in person. In the Phoenix area the sun was 63 percent covered at the maximum. Anthem resident Erik Victoria used a DSLR camera and a homemade solar filter to make the video above, as clouds challenged the view.

The images below were taken with an iPhone with eclipse glasses in front of the lens. By tapping on the sun, the camera automatically reduced the amount of light captured.

If you have images or experiences of the eclipse you’d like to share, add them to our Facebook posts on NoPhoNews or Anthem News.


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eclipse beginning phoenix
The eclipse just as it began this morning, with the moon moving in front of the sun. The images are dark because the eclipse filter blocks all but the brightest light. Photos by Robert Roy Britt
partial solar eclipse phoenix
By 9:50 a.m., the moon was well in front of the sun. Thin clouds covered the sun off and on during the eclipse but did not impair the view. The direct eyeball view through eclipse glasses was much sharper than what the camera captures here.
eclipse clouds
By 10:25 a.m., clouds got serious, covering the sun completely just prior to the moment of maximum coverage. Here, the sun peeks through clouds while it’s nearly 63 percent covered by the moon.

Clouds covered the sun fully at the moment of maximum coverage, from our vantage point in North Phoenix.

eclipse north phoenix 11 a.m.
At 11 a.m., the sun emerged briefly from the clouds. You can see how the moon’s position has shifted, compared to the earlier photos, as it exits.

The eclipse will be done at about noon in Arizona, when the moon moves out of the way of the sun from our vantage point. As the moon’s shadow moves to the eastern half of the country, online and TV viewing remains possible.

Steve Miller, an Anthem resident who drove to Wyoming to be in the path of the total eclipse, texted us some thought just prior to the sun going dark:

“Sunlight shining on my skin no longer feels warm, like it should.
… There is a bog below us, maybe half a mile away. The frogs, just now, started singing, like frogs do in the evening.
so cool!
… Very dim now. Sixteen more minutes.
… Sun looks like a crescent moon.
… Things are changing really, really fast now.
… There will likely be a very thin cloud over the sun.
… There are crickets singing now!!!
… Ten minutes. Sun is a sliver.
… No words.”

A NOAA satellite captured the moon’s shadow landing on Earth this morning as the total eclipse began in the Pacific Northwest:

moon shadow
A real moon shadow. Image: NOAA

Meanwhile, here’s what the total eclipse looked like from Jefferson City, Missouri:

total eclipse
The total eclipse from Missouri. Image: NASA
Robert Roy Britt
NoPho resident Robert Roy Britt has written for In&Out publications since its inception in 2005. Britt began his journalism career in New Jersey newspapers in the early 1990s. He later became a science writer and was editor-in-chief of the online media sites Space.com and Live Science. He has written four novels.
Robert Roy Britt on Email

Robert Roy Britt

NoPho resident Robert Roy Britt has written for In&Out publications since its inception in 2005. Britt began his journalism career in New Jersey newspapers in the early 1990s. He later became a science writer and was editor-in-chief of the online media sites Space.com and Live Science. He has written four novels.

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