First COVID-19 Case Reported in Anthem Country Club

The first case of COVID-19, the disease caused by the coronavirus, was reported March 21 in Anthem Country Club, Brad Harrington, general manager of Anthem Golf & Country Club.

“One of our Members has tested positive for COVID-19,” Harrington wrote in an email to club residents. “The last time the member was in the Club was Monday, March 16 in the fitness area and Tuesday, March 17, for bocce. The Member’s spouse, who has also been tested for the virus but does not yet have the results, played golf Tuesday, March 17, and Friday, March 20. Since this time, the Club has been repeatedly cleaned and sanitized, and our clubhouse and fitness areas are closed.”

The man, who was not identified, is in self-quarantine, recovering at home, and starting to feel better, Harrington said.

“We would like to remind Members if you are not feeling well or you have been in direct contact with someone who tested positive, please follow the CDC guidelines available on their website,  www.cdc.gov.”

The CDC, along with state and federal health officials, advise people to:

  • Stay at home if you don’t need to be out
  • Avoid large gatherings and crowded places
  • Stay at least 6 feet from other people and avoid handshakes
  • Wash hands with soap and water often and after touching any surfaces, scrubbing for 20 seconds
  • Disinfect doorknobs, counters and other hard surfaces (how)
  • Sneeze or cough into your elbow or a tissue (and toss it immediately)

COVID-19 is not just a problem for the elderly, as some early articles on the disease suggested.

A study March 16 in the journal Science found that for every known case of COVID-19, five to 10 others go undiagnosed, but these individuals cause “stealth transmission” of the disease. One person with no symptoms can, as a so-called “super spreader,” infect dozens of others, past epidemics have shown. Scientists say this is happening with the coronavirus. Other recent research has shown that while the people most susceptible to severe cases are the elderly and those with pre-existing health conditions, all people 30 and up are at risk for serious symptoms and even death.

Anyone who suspects they might have the disease—especially if they develop a fever and symptoms, such as cough or difficulty breathing—or is feeling ill and is concerned, should contact a healthcare provider by phone but not go in person, the CDC says. Emergency rooms, doctor’s offices and other healthcare facilities need to know when a potentially infected person is coming in, so they can prepare. Meantime, self-isolation is recommended.

“We are committed to open and transparent communication and we will continue to keep you informed,” Harrington said. “Our thoughts are with our members and our entire community as we navigate this challenging situation.”

As of March 21, there were 152 cases of COVID-19 in Arizona, including 81 in Maricopa County. The first death in the state caused by COVID-19 was announced March 20, and a second one was announced March 22.

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Robert Roy Britt
NoPho resident Robert Roy Britt has written for In&Out publications since its inception in 2005. Britt began his journalism career in New Jersey newspapers in the early 1990s. He later became a science writer and was editor-in-chief of the online media sites Space.com and Live Science. He has written four novels. Email the author.
Robert Roy Britt on Email

Robert Roy Britt

NoPho resident Robert Roy Britt has written for In&Out publications since its inception in 2005. Britt began his journalism career in New Jersey newspapers in the early 1990s. He later became a science writer and was editor-in-chief of the online media sites Space.com and Live Science. He has written four novels. Email the author.

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